Top Tips for Healthy Eating


Last Thursday I had the great pleasure of speaking to six classes of students at Brattleboro Union High School. I spoke to students in health class as part of nutrition week. It was a phenomenal honor to be able to educate young people on the benefits of holistic wellness. We went over the differences in the USDA My Plate Graphic and the Integrative Nutrition Plate. I believe that it is extremely important to educate young people on the benefits of whole grains vs. processed grains and water vs. dairy. I had a blast teaching these theories and seeing heads bobbing in acknowledgment! I think the information that I presented breaks down what to eat in a way that is more instinctual and less cerebral.

As my gift to you, I would like to share the tips that I concluded my lecture with. I hope that these tips will help to inform the choices that you make and lead gradually to a future of greater total body wellness through nutrition. Please share, print out, bookmark, etc.

With love,

-Angie

COACH ANGIE’S TIPS FOR CHOOSING THE RIGHT FOODS

-choose foods without labels (fresh vegetables, fruits)

-if there is a label, make sure you can read and understand all of the ingredients

-choose a variety of colors (of produce) for maximum nutrient consumption

-eat mindfully – pay attention to the way your food looks and tastes, chew, and relax

-listen to your body – observe how you feel physically and emotionally after eating

-eat foods that make you feel vibrant, energetic, and clear-headed and happy!

-90/10 diet – eat healthy (organic if possible) whole foods 90% of the time – 10% of the time you get to indulge

Hurry Up and Slow Down!


It is suddenly winter here in Southern Vermont! But only a little. It snowed. It stuck. It’s official. (So what if it was gone the next day?) ūüėČ

The day before the forecast I realized that I needed to finish up some projects that I have been procrastinating on since the lazy, hazy summer was still lingering. Most glaringly: lawn debris! Walking back from the mailbox, and with the forecast looming in my mind, I said to myself “OK! Real talk time: this stuff could be buried under a foot (I exaggerate in my mind… Don’t we all?) of snow and ice tomorrow! I need to kick it into high gear! It’s time to ride that autumn wave of productivity and clean up my yard, and house before winter is fully here and all I want to do is curl up in my house/cave!!!”

It is time to pull out that dusty to-do list, and scratch off a few stragglers so that the holidays and the winter months may pass peacefully. Aren’t you getting the urge to snuggle up on the couch with a good book and a cup of cocoa just about every day now?! Before you hunker down for good, get some final housekeeping (literal and figurative) done, and you’ll lift a weight off of your shoulders.

get ready to relax!

get ready to relax!

Hurry UP! And then, slow down.

I know I will!

1. make a to-do list

2. complete a few tasks

3. get the ball rolling on a few more tasks that will take time and other forces to come to completion

4. feel great about tackling those tasks!

5. relax!

Wishing you all the motivation, celebration and peace possible! I’m rooting for you!

Boundaries


Learning to assert our own personal boundaries is often a life-long process. We begin (often clumsily) as children: shoving others out of our personal bubble, crying when some other kid takes our toys, leaning over someone to grab the book that we want (elbowing them in the face in the process)…

At home, we learn to draw boundaries around our beds, bedrooms, diaries and physical property. By middle school, we are learning how to assert our boundaries surrounding our rapidly changing physical bodies. In high school, our sexuality blossoms and boundaries may be greatly challenged.

In young adulthood, we struggle with asserting our independence, needs, and wishes with a variety of people: our bosses, co-workers, house mates, and family. At this stage of life, we are thrust into a life of greater responsibility.

We have to learn what our wishes and needs are, as well as what we don’t want in our lives, in order to recognize and assert our boundaries. A person who is not very self aware will have a hard time asserting appropriate boundaries. A common response is to set hard and fast general boundaries that may be interpreted as being stubborn and withdrawn. An equally common response is to set no or very little boundaries. This person will have a hard time saying “no” and is often engaged in various activities with a wide range of people all the time. They will always help you (and everyone else in their lives) no matter the circumstances, and ask nothing in return.

don’t let turkeys push your boundaries

I have recently been challenged with drawing boundaries around my personal self and business self. Starting my own health coaching practice has required my face, name, and contact information to be blasted all over my (physical and online) community. I can not hide from dangers and stress. I must face it head-on, or risk tarnishing my professional name. Don’t get me wrong, I am still just an ordinary person, who sometimes pays her bills late, forgets to bring back library books, and occasionally sleeps through her alarm.¬† Continue reading

Weathering The Storm


In modern times, it has become commonplace to refer to a variety of emotional and physical conditions with the blanket term “stress”. ¬†People will often use the excuse “I’m stressed out” to mean “I am physically ill with panic and anxiety” or “I am so depressed I can hardly function” or simply, “I have over-scheduled myself”. ¬†There are so many common conditions that range from mild to deadly serious that relate to emotion health. ¬†In American society, we have put too much emphasis on productivity, and have connected being overly productive to being successful and even popular. An imbalance is highly likely to occur when we chronically over-work ourselves and do not take the time to reflect and process our emotions. ¬†Because our society in general views mental health problems as abnormal and undesired, people experiencing emotional issues are likely to keep them to themselves, become isolated, and exacerbate the problem. ¬†There are probably many high functioning people with anxiety, depression, PTSD, eating disorders or a similar condition in your life right now. ¬†Maybe you quietly suffer yourself. ¬†

Today I will present some tips on how to “weather the storm” and regain balance if you are suffering from an emotional health issue. ¬†I have found these practices helpful for my own battles with anxiety, depression and PTSD. ¬†I hope they will help you no matter what your situation. Continue reading