Top Tips for Healthy Eating


Last Thursday I had the great pleasure of speaking to six classes of students at Brattleboro Union High School. I spoke to students in health class as part of nutrition week. It was a phenomenal honor to be able to educate young people on the benefits of holistic wellness. We went over the differences in the USDA My Plate Graphic and the Integrative Nutrition Plate. I believe that it is extremely important to educate young people on the benefits of whole grains vs. processed grains and water vs. dairy. I had a blast teaching these theories and seeing heads bobbing in acknowledgment! I think the information that I presented breaks down what to eat in a way that is more instinctual and less cerebral.

As my gift to you, I would like to share the tips that I concluded my lecture with. I hope that these tips will help to inform the choices that you make and lead gradually to a future of greater total body wellness through nutrition. Please share, print out, bookmark, etc.

With love,

-Angie

COACH ANGIE’S TIPS FOR CHOOSING THE RIGHT FOODS

-choose foods without labels (fresh vegetables, fruits)

-if there is a label, make sure you can read and understand all of the ingredients

-choose a variety of colors (of produce) for maximum nutrient consumption

-eat mindfully – pay attention to the way your food looks and tastes, chew, and relax

-listen to your body – observe how you feel physically and emotionally after eating

-eat foods that make you feel vibrant, energetic, and clear-headed and happy!

-90/10 diet – eat healthy (organic if possible) whole foods 90% of the time – 10% of the time you get to indulge

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Hurry Up and Slow Down!


It is suddenly winter here in Southern Vermont! But only a little. It snowed. It stuck. It’s official. (So what if it was gone the next day?) 😉

The day before the forecast I realized that I needed to finish up some projects that I have been procrastinating on since the lazy, hazy summer was still lingering. Most glaringly: lawn debris! Walking back from the mailbox, and with the forecast looming in my mind, I said to myself “OK! Real talk time: this stuff could be buried under a foot (I exaggerate in my mind… Don’t we all?) of snow and ice tomorrow! I need to kick it into high gear! It’s time to ride that autumn wave of productivity and clean up my yard, and house before winter is fully here and all I want to do is curl up in my house/cave!!!”

It is time to pull out that dusty to-do list, and scratch off a few stragglers so that the holidays and the winter months may pass peacefully. Aren’t you getting the urge to snuggle up on the couch with a good book and a cup of cocoa just about every day now?! Before you hunker down for good, get some final housekeeping (literal and figurative) done, and you’ll lift a weight off of your shoulders.

get ready to relax!

get ready to relax!

Hurry UP! And then, slow down.

I know I will!

1. make a to-do list

2. complete a few tasks

3. get the ball rolling on a few more tasks that will take time and other forces to come to completion

4. feel great about tackling those tasks!

5. relax!

Wishing you all the motivation, celebration and peace possible! I’m rooting for you!

Fight-or-Flight


ImageOn top of this mountain, when a quick storm rolled in, I panicked.  I was alone, without food or shelter, and running low on water.  I had gone hiking on a whim and had not told anyone where I was going.  I took a deep breath and decided to head down the mountain at a slightly quicker than leisurely pace.  But a short time ago in human history, I would not have panicked.  I would have been used to enduring the elements and weathering the storm.  The anxiety that kicked in was my body’s natural response to a scary situation: the fight-or-flight response.  But a wild human would not have that reaction to a mere thundershower.  That response would be reserved for real, life-threatening danger.  For many of us, our fight-or-flight response needs to be re-calibrated. Read my post about weathering the emotional storm here. And be well.

This hike is a short and rewarding one in Dummerston, VT.  For more on hiking Vermont check out http://www.voga.org/hiking.htm